Tag Archives: The story behind the paper

Why do people with multiple long-term conditions report worse patient experience in primary care?

A new paper by CCHSR researchers, based on the GP Patient Survey, explores why people with multimorbidity report more negative experiences of care compared to those patients who have none, or one, long-term conditions.

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Is an intensive treatment regimen for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients cost-effective? Economic evaluation of the 5-year results of the ADDITION study.

A new paper in Diabetic Medicine reports an economic evaluation of the ADDITION study, based on the five year follow-up data.  The Anglo-Danish-Dutch study of Intensive Treatment In peOple with screeN detected diabetes (ADDITION) is a prospective randomised controlled trial of screening and intensive treatment of newly diagnosed type-2 diabetes patients. The five-year outcomes, published …read more

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So does QOF really reduce emergency hospital admissions?

What should you make of our latest paper suggesting that QOF reduced emergency admissions? There have now been over 20 systematic reviews of pay for performance (P4P) and even a systematic review of systematic reviews. A reasonable summary would be that P4P seems to improve the processes of care somewhat (and with the potential for …read more

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Are patient experience surveys for quality assurance or quality improvement?

Patient experience surveys in primary care carry an expectation that they will stimulate change. Our focus group study in 14 practices explores why practice staff struggle to identify and action improvements as a result of patient feedback alone.

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Lesbian, gay and bisexual men and women in England report poorer health and worse experiences of healthcare in the NHS

Our analysis of 27,000 responses to the national GP Patient Survey finds gay, lesbian and bisexual people are more likely to report communication problems and have less trust in their GP…

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Care plans and care planning: a rare event?

Have you seen a care plan recently? Despite a massive effort, we didn’t see many in our national evaluation of care plans and care planning. Our new paper reports the findings of this work, summarised here.

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Does pay for performance work or doesn’t it?

Martin Roland discusses the effects of pay for performance, following on from our study published in the New England Journal of Medicine this week.

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How can we improve GP access?

A recent study led by researchers from the CCHSR, in collaboration with our Exeter colleagues, has found that poor access to GPs during normal working hours is associated with increased out of hours primary care use. In this study using data from about 567,000 patients in the 2011/12 GP Patient Survey, we found that: Inconvenient …read more

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Want to assess doctors’ communication skills? Introducing the Global Consultation Rating Scale (or GCRS, for short)

CCHSR researchers publish a new scale to evaluate the communication quality of consultations – read more for full details

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The cost of smoking breaks at work… compared with what?

According to a report in today’s Guardian (Monday 3rd March), smoking breaks at work “cost British businesses £8.4bn a year”, or £1815 per smoking employee. But compared with what, and would we really see that much of a boost to the economy if smoking were eliminated? Ed Wilson takes a closer look at the figures.

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  • The Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (CCHSR) is a thriving collaboration between the University of Cambridge and RAND Europe. We aim to inform health policy and practice by conducting research and evaluation studies of organisation and delivery of healthcare, including safety, effectiveness, efficiency and patient experience.