Tag Archives: The story behind the paper

Academics and alchemists: hitting gold in research dissemination

These days, dissemination of academic research is a core part of any academics’ responsibilities, often with little resource to help. How do you do yours? And how does it all really work? Read on for five simple steps to help.

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What do doctors think of patient experience surveys?

Patient surveys have become increasingly important in recent years, in part due to policy initiatives that emphasise the utility of patient feedback for quality improvement. In England, patient experience is measured by surveys including the General Practice Patient Survey (GPPS) in primary care and the Inpatient Survey in secondary care. At the individual doctor level, …read more

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Language and GP-patient communication: demonstrating the obvious

Unless you’ve been stranded on a desert island for the last decade, you might just have noticed that lots of health care types are interested in the idea of patient experience. Patient experience is all that stuff that goes on which isn’t directly about clinical effectiveness (is this the miracle cure?) or patient safety (have …read more

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What is the impact of candy-like flavoured e-cigarette adverts on children?

In a special guest post, Milica Vasiljevic from our colleagues at the Behaviour and Health Research Unit considers the impact of e-cig advertising on children

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How many emergency admissions can primary care policies actually prevent? Answer: Not many.

Emergency admissions, as well as the obvious effect on the patient, family and carers, cost a lot. In 2012, they cost the NHS over £12.5 billion, so understandably there is a desire to contain these costs as they may be better spent elsewhere. A good number of these admissions will be unavoidable and the NHS …read more

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Inequalities in patient experience of communication by ethnic group: new evidence

If you have even a passing concern about inequalities in health care, you’re likely to be familiar with the idea that minority ethnic groups tend to report more negative experiences of health care compared to their counterparts in the majority ethnic group. In the UK, this means that people identifying, particularly, as being of South …read more

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“We torture them before they die”

This telling phrase comes from a paper by Liz Dzeng and colleagues (1) which describes the distress felt by young American doctors who feel obliged to deliver futile treatments to patients at the end of life. In part this comes from an excessive move away from paternalism (‘let the doctor decide’) to prioritise patient autonomy …read more

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Timely diagnosis of cancer matters for patient experience

In our recent paper we studied how pre-diagnosis experience affects subsequent care experience in cancer patients (1). Our findings suggest that patients who experienced more pre-referral consultations in primary care are more likely to be less satisfied with their care. As perhaps could have been expected, the associations found were stronger for questions involving primary care …read more

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Drug safety in a world of multimorbidity and polypharmacy

New research describes an association between use of two commonly used medications and brain haemorrhage. CCHSR’s Rupert Payne doesn’t necessarily think it’s that straightforward.

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Mixed methods and corny metaphors

How often does “mixed methods” mean “mixed methods”? Not quite as often as we might hope…

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  • The Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (CCHSR) is a thriving collaboration between the University of Cambridge and RAND Europe. We aim to inform health policy and practice by conducting research and evaluation studies of organisation and delivery of healthcare, including safety, effectiveness, efficiency and patient experience.