Tag Archives: Quality of care

Why don’t care coordination interventions work?

Trials of care coordination are often disappointing. Well, they quite often show improved quality of care and improved patient experience but they rarely seem to save money. Which is a pity because that’s often why they’re set up. Or at least the mantra is “Fragmented care is wasteful, so if we get it better coordinated, …read more

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Wrong kind of care plans?

Doctors are pretty sceptical about care plans. No less so since the government started providing incentives for patients with long term conditions to have care plans. Yet a published Cochrane Review suggests that care plans can improve physical and mental health and improve people’s confidence in managing their own conditions [1]. So what’s the reason …read more

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So will pharmacists save the NHS?

Well maybe, but we shouldn’t get too carried away. The RCGP and RPS have produced a joint statement of how pharmacists and GPs could work better together and the news media today are talking about an ‘army’ of pharmacists coming to the rescue of general practice. Should we be greeting the cavalry with open arms? …read more

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So has QOF reduced death rates or not?

The question of whether improving healthcare leads to improvements in health remains an important one. Martin Roland outlines why a recent BMJ analysis on the relationship between QOF and mortality may not take the right approach to answering this.

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What can we do to promote person-centred primary care? Response to BMJ spotlight

 Patient centred care invites doctors and patients to work collaboratively to improve the way healthcare is designed and delivered so that it better meets the needs and priorities of patients. Charlotte Paddison reflects on the BMJ spotlight on patient centred care, and asks what this might mean for primary care? How can we get better …read more

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Does Hinchingbrooke spell the end for privately run NHS hospitals?

Well, it doesn’t look good, does it? The private sector comes in with a flourish and then when the financial going gets tough and they’re about to get a dressing down on quality, Circle just walks away. However, the reality is a bit more complex than that. This hospital has struggled financially for years. For …read more

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So does QOF really reduce emergency hospital admissions?

What should you make of our latest paper suggesting that QOF reduced emergency admissions? There have now been over 20 systematic reviews of pay for performance (P4P) and even a systematic review of systematic reviews. A reasonable summary would be that P4P seems to improve the processes of care somewhat (and with the potential for …read more

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When incentives go wrong – £55 for dementia diagnosis is a dead cert.

People argue a lot about whether it’s a good idea to give financial incentives to doctors to provide good care. There’s an argument that you should when it costs more to provide that care. Then there’s the more contentious issue of whether a cash incentive is a useful addition. The evidence is that incentives do …read more

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Does pay for performance work or doesn’t it?

Martin Roland discusses the effects of pay for performance, following on from our study published in the New England Journal of Medicine this week.

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European Conference on Health Economics – Dublin, July 2014

Last week saw the European Conference on Health Economics (ECHE) hosted by Trinity College Dublin.  CCHSR’s Ed Wilson was there. International conferences are always a great opportunity to find out what your colleagues are up to in different corners of the world.  ECHE was no exception.  The venue was Trinity College Dublin, home to the beautifully …read more

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