Tag Archives: Quality of care

Quality and safety: Reflecting on the state of general practice

The vast majority of English GP practices provide good or outstanding care, according to inspections of 7,365 practices in a new report by the Care Quality Commission. This is welcome news not just for patients, but also for GPs working hard at the front line. Perhaps most impressive is evidence of continual quality improvement, with …read more

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Pushing the frontiers of improvement research

This blog was originally published by Mary Dixon-Woods on the Health Foundation’s website which can be found here: www.health.org.uk Since 2010 the Health Foundation has been investing in and promoting improvement research; the work they have supported has improved care and altered national policy. We are delighted that the Foundation is now investing around £40 million …read more

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Can patient surveys identify poor quality GP-patient communication?

Good GP-patient communication is a good thing, right? We’ll probably all agree on that – but whether we know if communication is of high or low quality is a rather more complex issue, as our latest research shows

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Is medical error really the third leading cause of death in the US?

A recent claim that medical error constitutes the 3rd leading cause of death in the US has been challenged by Mary Dixon-Woods, our co-Director and new RAND Professor of Health Services Research. As reported in The Guardian, Professor Dixon-Woods and Kaveh G. Shojania – both editors of BMJ Quality and Safety – responded to a …read more

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How do we deliver compassionate care?

The Francis report asked probing questions about the provision of compassionate care within the NHS. Responses from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) and The King’s Fund have focused on promoting ‘well-led’ care. From a psychological point of view we might also raise questions about role of emotion in compassionate care. In an organisational culture that …read more

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New developments in diabetes technology: challenges and opportunities

New medical technologies are often developed and introduced at a much slower rate than patients and clinicians could wish. There are many reasons for this, including unanticipated complications arising during trials and the overarching need to ensure patient safety. In some cases, moreover, concepts emerge well before the technology exists to make their realisation a …read more

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Choose and Book should be scrapped and outpatients could be reduced by 50%

There’s nothing like a good bold assertion to start a debate. Martin Roland, our CCHSR co-director, and  Sam Everington, general all-star GP, have made some rather dramatic suggestions and claims in the HSJ this week. They think that the present referral system is an archaic hangover from 1948 which services the needs of neither GPs, …read more

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Changing how GPs practice – it really can work

When we produced our report “The Future of Primary Care: Creating Teams for Tomorrow” in the summer (1), the little negative comment there was arose from the idea of larger multi-disciplinary teams, including pharmacists and new roles such as physician associates. GPs worried about what they’d find for these people to do, how they’d train …read more

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“We torture them before they die”

This telling phrase comes from a paper by Liz Dzeng and colleagues (1) which describes the distress felt by young American doctors who feel obliged to deliver futile treatments to patients at the end of life. In part this comes from an excessive move away from paternalism (‘let the doctor decide’) to prioritise patient autonomy …read more

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High users don’t always stay high users (again)

OK, so maybe this is labouring the point as we’ve gone on about this out before – e.g. see our previous papers on the subject (here and here). Nevertheless, it’s nice to find that someone else agrees. This time it’s a study from the US. They call their frequent flyers ‘super-utilizers’ but it’s the same …read more

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  • The Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (CCHSR) is a thriving collaboration between the University of Cambridge and RAND Europe. We aim to inform health policy and practice by conducting research and evaluation studies of organisation and delivery of healthcare, including safety, effectiveness, efficiency and patient experience.