Tag Archives: Politics and policy

A realistic vision for primary care?

CCHSR Co-Director Prof Martin Roland has been a little busy of late, as Chair of the Primary Care Workforce Commission. Their report has just been launched…so what does it say for the future of primary care?

Posted in Blog | Also tagged | Group: | Comments closed

Lords Reform: An unnecessary procedure?

As the election looms, what might various parties’ plans for reform of the House of Lords mean for the scrutiny of health and health care related legislation? Conor Farrington, a medical sociologist at CCHSR (but we stole him from political science), raises some concerns.

Posted in Blog | Tagged | Group: | Comments closed

Don’t incentivise withholding of antibiotics!

Don’t prescribe too many antibiotics. And just to make sure you behave, we’ll pay you not to. That’s the latest message GPs are being given by the government. I personally find this very irritating. GPs are well aware of the public health implications of prescribing too many antibiotics, and the consequent risks of antibiotic resistance. …read more

Posted in Blog, News | Also tagged , , | Group: | Comments closed

NHS reforms: plus ça change

The King’s Fund today released the first half of its verdict on how well the coalition has done on the NHS.  The second half – looking at NHS performance since 2010 – will be released in March, but today’s report focuses on the Lansley reforms.  Their verdict?  To put it bluntly, damning.  ‘Distracting and damaging’ were …read more

Posted in Blog | Also tagged | Group: | Comments closed

Does Hinchingbrooke spell the end for privately run NHS hospitals?

Well, it doesn’t look good, does it? The private sector comes in with a flourish and then when the financial going gets tough and they’re about to get a dressing down on quality, Circle just walks away. However, the reality is a bit more complex than that. This hospital has struggled financially for years. For …read more

Posted in Blog | Also tagged | Group: | Comments closed

Multi-morbidity and the Emperor’s New Clothes: a challenge for primary care researchers

Are single disease guidelines and indicators are going out of fashion? Well they are with people interested in multi-morbidity. The argument is straightforward. Single disease guidelines are usually based on trials which exclude people with multiple complex problems. So how does the physician know how a cholesterol guideline developed from trials on 65 year old …read more

Posted in Blog | Also tagged , | Group: | Comments closed

The economics won’t go away: NHS Cancer Drugs Fund to consider cost-effectiveness

This week, NHS England published its revised process for operation of the cancer drugs fund.  Of particular interest is the requirement to take into account both costs and effects of treatments. NICE was set up in 1999 with the remit of considering the value for money, or cost-effectiveness of new and existing treatments. It is …read more

Posted in Blog | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

When incentives go wrong – £55 for dementia diagnosis is a dead cert.

People argue a lot about whether it’s a good idea to give financial incentives to doctors to provide good care. There’s an argument that you should when it costs more to provide that care. Then there’s the more contentious issue of whether a cash incentive is a useful addition. The evidence is that incentives do …read more

Posted in Blog | Also tagged | Group: | Comments closed

Cambs CCG gives £800m contract to NHS bidder. Should we all be cheering?

There seems to be general relief that the huge £800m contract which Cambridgeshire and Peterborough CCG have given for integrated care of the elderly hasn’t gone to the private sector. Two of the three final bidders were commercial organisations, but the contract has gone to an alliance between the local teaching hospital, Addenbrooke’s, and the …read more

Posted in Blog | Also tagged , | Group: | Comments closed

Seven day access – policy goes in the wrong direction – again!

Politicians just don’t get it. They are (and have been for years) obsessed with increasing access to GPs. And of course it sounds good for elections. But it’s not what the population needs. Increasing access comes at the expense of continuity of care. You can’t see your own doctor and expect him or her to …read more

Posted in Blog | Also tagged , , | Group: | Comments closed
  • The Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (CCHSR) is a thriving collaboration between the University of Cambridge and RAND Europe. We aim to inform health policy and practice by conducting research and evaluation studies of organisation and delivery of healthcare, including safety, effectiveness, efficiency and patient experience.