Tag Archives: Politics and policy

For the NHS, it’s likely that history will keep repeating itself

Professor Martin Roland reflects on the NHS – past, present, and future – following his CCHSR Annual Lecture on the subject on 6th December 2016 at the University of Cambridge

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Is this the rescue package general practice needs?

Two big new reports – NHS England’s General Practice Forward View, and the House of Commons Health Committee’s Report on Primary Care – set out the extent of the crisis in general practice. But, as Prof Martin Roland argues, perhaps they also do offer some really good solutions.

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How do we deliver compassionate care?

The Francis report asked probing questions about the provision of compassionate care within the NHS. Responses from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) and The King’s Fund have focused on promoting ‘well-led’ care. From a psychological point of view we might also raise questions about role of emotion in compassionate care. In an organisational culture that …read more

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General practice is in crisis: here are five possible solutions

General Practice is the foundation stone of the NHS: if it fails, the whole system will fail. That’s the urgent warning in a new BMJ Editorial from CCHSR Co-Director Martin Roland and Sam Everington, Chair of Tower Hamlets Clinical Commissioning Group. In this piece, Roland and Everington point out that, whilst the whole NHS is …read more

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Delivering on the promise of personalised medicine

There is currently relatively little evidence about where we might obtain the best value from genomic testing, which has the potential to offer patients information about the risk of many different conditions. This has led to individuals involved in genomic research to speculate on what impact an increased use of genomic information will have on …read more

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How many emergency admissions can primary care policies actually prevent? Answer: Not many.

Emergency admissions, as well as the obvious effect on the patient, family and carers, cost a lot. In 2012, they cost the NHS over £12.5 billion, so understandably there is a desire to contain these costs as they may be better spent elsewhere. A good number of these admissions will be unavoidable and the NHS …read more

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Choose and Book should be scrapped and outpatients could be reduced by 50%

There’s nothing like a good bold assertion to start a debate. Martin Roland, our CCHSR co-director, and  Sam Everington, general all-star GP, have made some rather dramatic suggestions and claims in the HSJ this week. They think that the present referral system is an archaic hangover from 1948 which services the needs of neither GPs, …read more

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Simons Stevens, Chief Executive of the NHS, gives our annual lecture

For a summary of Simon Steven’s lecture, see our Storify. The Chief Executive of the NHS, Stevens last night gave our annual CCHSR lecture. He talked to a packed room of medics, academics, voluntary sector and policy representatives about “future directions” of the NHS – or in fact health care more generally.

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Changing how GPs practice – it really can work

When we produced our report “The Future of Primary Care: Creating Teams for Tomorrow” in the summer (1), the little negative comment there was arose from the idea of larger multi-disciplinary teams, including pharmacists and new roles such as physician associates. GPs worried about what they’d find for these people to do, how they’d train …read more

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High users don’t always stay high users (again)

OK, so maybe this is labouring the point as we’ve gone on about this out before – e.g. see our previous papers on the subject (here and here). Nevertheless, it’s nice to find that someone else agrees. This time it’s a study from the US. They call their frequent flyers ‘super-utilizers’ but it’s the same …read more

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