Tag Archives: Multimorbidity

Why don’t care coordination interventions work?

Trials of care coordination are often disappointing. Well, they quite often show improved quality of care and improved patient experience but they rarely seem to save money. Which is a pity because that’s often why they’re set up. Or at least the mantra is “Fragmented care is wasteful, so if we get it better coordinated, …read more

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Wrong kind of care plans?

Doctors are pretty sceptical about care plans. No less so since the government started providing incentives for patients with long term conditions to have care plans. Yet a published Cochrane Review suggests that care plans can improve physical and mental health and improve people’s confidence in managing their own conditions [1]. So what’s the reason …read more

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Drug safety in a world of multimorbidity and polypharmacy

New research describes an association between use of two commonly used medications and brain haemorrhage. CCHSR’s Rupert Payne doesn’t necessarily think it’s that straightforward.

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Why do people with multiple long-term conditions report worse patient experience in primary care?

A new paper by CCHSR researchers, based on the GP Patient Survey, explores why people with multimorbidity report more negative experiences of care compared to those patients who have none, or one, long-term conditions.

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Multi-morbidity and the Emperor’s New Clothes: a challenge for primary care researchers

Are single disease guidelines and indicators are going out of fashion? Well they are with people interested in multi-morbidity. The argument is straightforward. Single disease guidelines are usually based on trials which exclude people with multiple complex problems. So how does the physician know how a cholesterol guideline developed from trials on 65 year old …read more

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How do people with diabetes describe their experiences in primary care?

Well, actually quite good news here. People with diabetes in England report primary care experiences that are at least as good as those without diabetes for most domains of care. This is one of our conclusions from our analysis of responses to the English national GP Patient Survey from 85,760 patients with self-reported diabetes. However, …read more

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Care plans and care planning: a rare event?

Have you seen a care plan recently? Despite a massive effort, we didn’t see many in our national evaluation of care plans and care planning. Our new paper reports the findings of this work, summarised here.

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The King’s Fund: Polypharmacy and Medicines Optimisation

Policy, medical training and clinical practice have failed to adapt to a significant increase in the number of patients taking multiple prescription drugs, according to a new report published by The King’s Fund. CCHSR’s Rupert Payne co-authored the report, and discusses its implications.

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Inappropriate medicines and prescribing – why it matters

Over the last year, the English NHS spent £10 billion on prescribing around a billion items in primary care. Yet a substantial amount of medication use may be potentially inappropriate. How can we as researchers potentially address this problem?

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Being polite about care planning

Care planning in long-term conditions is a key policy initiative in the NHS. However, our evaluation of its implementation revealed a large gap between rhetoric and reality. Here, we look back at the story behind our paper on patient experiences of care planning.

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  • The Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (CCHSR) is a thriving collaboration between the University of Cambridge and RAND Europe. We aim to inform health policy and practice by conducting research and evaluation studies of organisation and delivery of healthcare, including safety, effectiveness, efficiency and patient experience.