Tag Archives: CCHSR research

Choose and Book should be scrapped and outpatients could be reduced by 50%

There’s nothing like a good bold assertion to start a debate. Martin Roland, our CCHSR co-director, and  Sam Everington, general all-star GP, have made some rather dramatic suggestions and claims in the HSJ this week. They think that the present referral system is an archaic hangover from 1948 which services the needs of neither GPs, …read more

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GP triage and the case of NHS 111

A small study can sometimes have a greater than expected impact. Here’s a case in point – over the weekend, unexpected press coverage came our way over the fact that (in the words of the Daily Mail) there is an “NHS 111 farce” as “75% of patients referred to A&E do not actually need to …read more

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Inequalities in patient experience of communication by ethnic group: new evidence

If you have even a passing concern about inequalities in health care, you’re likely to be familiar with the idea that minority ethnic groups tend to report more negative experiences of health care compared to their counterparts in the majority ethnic group. In the UK, this means that people identifying, particularly, as being of South …read more

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Timely diagnosis of cancer matters for patient experience

In our recent paper we studied how pre-diagnosis experience affects subsequent care experience in cancer patients (1). Our findings suggest that patients who experienced more pre-referral consultations in primary care are more likely to be less satisfied with their care. As perhaps could have been expected, the associations found were stronger for questions involving primary care …read more

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Why do people with multiple long-term conditions report worse patient experience in primary care?

A new paper by CCHSR researchers, based on the GP Patient Survey, explores why people with multimorbidity report more negative experiences of care compared to those patients who have none, or one, long-term conditions.

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Did you catch the anglerfish? Navigating the depths of qualitative research

How should we go about presenting qualitative health services research which is rigorous, rich, but also able to be understood by a wide audience? Jenni Burt argues you should reach the depths, but maybe not tell everyone about it…

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What can we do to promote person-centred primary care? Response to BMJ spotlight

 Patient centred care invites doctors and patients to work collaboratively to improve the way healthcare is designed and delivered so that it better meets the needs and priorities of patients. Charlotte Paddison reflects on the BMJ spotlight on patient centred care, and asks what this might mean for primary care? How can we get better …read more

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Understanding user interactions with the artificial pancreas

The ‘artificial pancreas’ is a new treatment for diabetes which allows for the automatic control of blood glucose levels by replicating some of the functions of a healthy pancreas. The system wirelessly links together a set of devices – a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and insulin pump, both body-mounted, and a tablet-mounted algorithm – in …read more

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Asking the right questions

One of the great things about Twitter is that you get to read other peoples’ takes on things. Matthew Hankins, for example, posts people’s interpretations of p-values (under the hashtag #stillnotsignificant), which are more entertaining than you might think. A few weeks ago he posted the conclusion from a paper which read: “we were quite …read more

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Lesbian, gay and bisexual men and women in England report poorer health and worse experiences of healthcare in the NHS

Our analysis of 27,000 responses to the national GP Patient Survey finds gay, lesbian and bisexual people are more likely to report communication problems and have less trust in their GP…

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  • The Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (CCHSR) is a thriving collaboration between the University of Cambridge and RAND Europe. We aim to inform health policy and practice by conducting research and evaluation studies of organisation and delivery of healthcare, including safety, effectiveness, efficiency and patient experience.