Tag Archives: CCHSR research

Trouble getting an appointment at your GP surgery? Findings from an evaluation of a ‘telephone first’ approach to demand management in general practice

Martin Roland and Jenny Newbould, Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research It’s certainly an increasingly common problem.  You spend ages trying to get through to your GP surgery, only to be told there is not an appointment for a week or two; maybe even six weeks if you want to see Dr Popular.  So, why …read more

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What should we do about patient experience in primary care?

I’ve never been a very good long-distance runner, but in finally seeing through our NIHR programme grant on patient experience I feel like I’ve crossed the line at an ultramarathon. In a good way, I hasten to add, with five years’ investigation into the impact and utility of measuring patient experience in primary care resulting, …read more

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Understanding patient worries about wasting medical time

If you have ever wondered whether or not your visit to the doctor was really necessary, you are certainly not alone. Studies in the UK have repeatedly shown that worries about ‘wasting the doctor’s time’ are one factor influencing patients’ decisions about whether or not to make a medical appointment. Our work is the first study devoted …read more

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Are longer consultations important for good patient experience?

Consultation length is a perennial topic of concern and interest. In our new research, we looked at how consultation length may (or may not) impact on reported patient experience.

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Can patient surveys identify poor quality GP-patient communication?

Good GP-patient communication is a good thing, right? We’ll probably all agree on that – but whether we know if communication is of high or low quality is a rather more complex issue, as our latest research shows

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Do minority ethnic groups really have worse experiences of doctor-patient interactions?

Are patient experience surveys really telling us about inequalities in minority ethnic groups experiences of care? Our new experimental vignette study has something interesting to say about this…

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What do doctors think of patient experience surveys?

Patient surveys have become increasingly important in recent years, in part due to policy initiatives that emphasise the utility of patient feedback for quality improvement. In England, patient experience is measured by surveys including the General Practice Patient Survey (GPPS) in primary care and the Inpatient Survey in secondary care. At the individual doctor level, …read more

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New developments in diabetes technology: challenges and opportunities

New medical technologies are often developed and introduced at a much slower rate than patients and clinicians could wish. There are many reasons for this, including unanticipated complications arising during trials and the overarching need to ensure patient safety. In some cases, moreover, concepts emerge well before the technology exists to make their realisation a …read more

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Which cancers are more difficult to suspect in primary care?

Back in 2012 members of our team reported the proportion of multiple (three or more) pre-referral consultations for 24 cancer diagnoses (1). This previous work provided evidence of the variability in the diagnostic difficulty of different cancers in primary care, reflecting the cancer’s ‘symptom signature’. This work used patient self-reported data from one year of …read more

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How many emergency admissions can primary care policies actually prevent? Answer: Not many.

Emergency admissions, as well as the obvious effect on the patient, family and carers, cost a lot. In 2012, they cost the NHS over £12.5 billion, so understandably there is a desire to contain these costs as they may be better spent elsewhere. A good number of these admissions will be unavoidable and the NHS …read more

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  • The Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (CCHSR) is a thriving collaboration between the University of Cambridge and RAND Europe. We aim to inform health policy and practice by conducting research and evaluation studies of organisation and delivery of healthcare, including safety, effectiveness, efficiency and patient experience.