Group Archives: Patient experience

Trouble getting an appointment at your GP surgery? Findings from an evaluation of a ‘telephone first’ approach to demand management in general practice

Martin Roland and Jenny Newbould, Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research It’s certainly an increasingly common problem.  You spend ages trying to get through to your GP surgery, only to be told there is not an appointment for a week or two; maybe even six weeks if you want to see Dr Popular.  So, why …read more

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What should we do about patient experience in primary care?

I’ve never been a very good long-distance runner, but in finally seeing through our NIHR programme grant on patient experience I feel like I’ve crossed the line at an ultramarathon. In a good way, I hasten to add, with five years’ investigation into the impact and utility of measuring patient experience in primary care resulting, …read more

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What does “good” really mean in patient experience surveys?

Evaluating our experiences can be tricky. I recently completed a two-day training course: the trainer was great, the content engaging and helpful, and I dutifully went down the evaluation form giving glowing reviews all round. In the circumstances, my assessment felt very genuine. Of course, there is the fact that the trainer was still standing …read more

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Are longer consultations important for good patient experience?

Consultation length is a perennial topic of concern and interest. In our new research, we looked at how consultation length may (or may not) impact on reported patient experience.

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Can patient surveys identify poor quality GP-patient communication?

Good GP-patient communication is a good thing, right? We’ll probably all agree on that – but whether we know if communication is of high or low quality is a rather more complex issue, as our latest research shows

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Do minority ethnic groups really have worse experiences of doctor-patient interactions?

Are patient experience surveys really telling us about inequalities in minority ethnic groups experiences of care? Our new experimental vignette study has something interesting to say about this…

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What do doctors think of patient experience surveys?

Patient surveys have become increasingly important in recent years, in part due to policy initiatives that emphasise the utility of patient feedback for quality improvement. In England, patient experience is measured by surveys including the General Practice Patient Survey (GPPS) in primary care and the Inpatient Survey in secondary care. At the individual doctor level, …read more

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How do we deliver compassionate care?

The Francis report asked probing questions about the provision of compassionate care within the NHS. Responses from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) and The King’s Fund have focused on promoting ‘well-led’ care. From a psychological point of view we might also raise questions about role of emotion in compassionate care. In an organisational culture that …read more

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Language and GP-patient communication: demonstrating the obvious

Unless you’ve been stranded on a desert island for the last decade, you might just have noticed that lots of health care types are interested in the idea of patient experience. Patient experience is all that stuff that goes on which isn’t directly about clinical effectiveness (is this the miracle cure?) or patient safety (have …read more

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Inequalities in patient experience of communication by ethnic group: new evidence

If you have even a passing concern about inequalities in health care, you’re likely to be familiar with the idea that minority ethnic groups tend to report more negative experiences of health care compared to their counterparts in the majority ethnic group. In the UK, this means that people identifying, particularly, as being of South …read more

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  • The Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (CCHSR) is a thriving collaboration between the University of Cambridge and RAND Europe. We aim to inform health policy and practice by conducting research and evaluation studies of organisation and delivery of healthcare, including safety, effectiveness, efficiency and patient experience.