Monthly Archives: February 2015

Is an intensive treatment regimen for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients cost-effective? Economic evaluation of the 5-year results of the ADDITION study.

A new paper in Diabetic Medicine reports an economic evaluation of the ADDITION study, based on the five year follow-up data.  The Anglo-Danish-Dutch study of Intensive Treatment In peOple with screeN detected diabetes (ADDITION) is a prospective randomised controlled trial of screening and intensive treatment of newly diagnosed type-2 diabetes patients. The five-year outcomes, published …read more

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Don’t incentivise withholding of antibiotics!

Don’t prescribe too many antibiotics. And just to make sure you behave, we’ll pay you not to. That’s the latest message GPs are being given by the government. I personally find this very irritating. GPs are well aware of the public health implications of prescribing too many antibiotics, and the consequent risks of antibiotic resistance. …read more

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What can we do to promote person-centred primary care? Response to BMJ spotlight

 Patient centred care invites doctors and patients to work collaboratively to improve the way healthcare is designed and delivered so that it better meets the needs and priorities of patients. Charlotte Paddison reflects on the BMJ spotlight on patient centred care, and asks what this might mean for primary care? How can we get better …read more

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Hunt’s proposed ranking of hospitals on avoidable mortality rates is a bad idea

Over the weekend it was announced that Jeremy Hunt wanted the NHS to tackle “avoidable deaths” in English hospitals (see this BBC report). On the face of it this seems like a good thing. Plans to review case-notes to see if anything could be learned, and then using these to establish a national rate of …read more

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NHS reforms: plus ça change

The King’s Fund today released the first half of its verdict on how well the coalition has done on the NHS.  The second half – looking at NHS performance since 2010 – will be released in March, but today’s report focuses on the Lansley reforms.  Their verdict?  To put it bluntly, damning.  ‘Distracting and damaging’ were …read more

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