Author Archives: Jenni Burt

Sparkle and joy: a totally one-sided round up of the 46th SAPC ASM (12-14 July 2017, Warwick)

A quick round-up of the highlights of the Society for Academic Primary Care conference in Warwick (12-14 July) by Jenni Burt.

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What should we do about patient experience in primary care?

I’ve never been a very good long-distance runner, but in finally seeing through our NIHR programme grant on patient experience I feel like I’ve crossed the line at an ultramarathon. In a good way, I hasten to add, with five years’ investigation into the impact and utility of measuring patient experience in primary care resulting, …read more

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What does “good” really mean in patient experience surveys?

Evaluating our experiences can be tricky. I recently completed a two-day training course: the trainer was great, the content engaging and helpful, and I dutifully went down the evaluation form giving glowing reviews all round. In the circumstances, my assessment felt very genuine. Of course, there is the fact that the trainer was still standing …read more

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Can patient surveys identify poor quality GP-patient communication?

Good GP-patient communication is a good thing, right? We’ll probably all agree on that – but whether we know if communication is of high or low quality is a rather more complex issue, as our latest research shows

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Do minority ethnic groups really have worse experiences of doctor-patient interactions?

Are patient experience surveys really telling us about inequalities in minority ethnic groups experiences of care? Our new experimental vignette study has something interesting to say about this…

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Academics and alchemists: hitting gold in research dissemination

These days, dissemination of academic research is a core part of any academics’ responsibilities, often with little resource to help. How do you do yours? And how does it all really work? Read on for five simple steps to help.

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Prof Mary Dixon-Woods: new RAND Professor of Health Services Research

We are absolutely delighted to announce that Prof Mary Dixon-Woods will be taking up the RAND Professorship of Health Services Research at the University of Cambridge. She is joining us from the University of Leicester, where she has led the SAPPHIRE (Social science APPlied to Healthcare Improvement REsearch) research group in the Department of Health …read more

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Language and GP-patient communication: demonstrating the obvious

Unless you’ve been stranded on a desert island for the last decade, you might just have noticed that lots of health care types are interested in the idea of patient experience. Patient experience is all that stuff that goes on which isn’t directly about clinical effectiveness (is this the miracle cure?) or patient safety (have …read more

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General practice is in crisis: here are five possible solutions

General Practice is the foundation stone of the NHS: if it fails, the whole system will fail. That’s the urgent warning in a new BMJ Editorial from CCHSR Co-Director Martin Roland and Sam Everington, Chair of Tower Hamlets Clinical Commissioning Group. In this piece, Roland and Everington point out that, whilst the whole NHS is …read more

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Choose and Book should be scrapped and outpatients could be reduced by 50%

There’s nothing like a good bold assertion to start a debate. Martin Roland, our CCHSR co-director, and  Sam Everington, general all-star GP, have made some rather dramatic suggestions and claims in the HSJ this week. They think that the present referral system is an archaic hangover from 1948 which services the needs of neither GPs, …read more

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  • The Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (CCHSR) is a thriving collaboration between the University of Cambridge and RAND Europe. We aim to inform health policy and practice by conducting research and evaluation studies of organisation and delivery of healthcare, including safety, effectiveness, efficiency and patient experience.