Author Archives: Conor Farrington

Looking at the future of diabetes care? Dual-hormone pump therapy at ATTD 2017

I recently travelled to Paris to present at the 10th International Conference on Advanced Technologies & Treatments for Diabetes (ATTD). While the conference is primarily focused on biomedical science and new technologies and treatments, there is also a significant focus on psychosocial aspects of patient interaction with new diabetes technologies such as ‘artificial pancreas’ systems …read more

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What do doctors think of patient experience surveys?

Patient surveys have become increasingly important in recent years, in part due to policy initiatives that emphasise the utility of patient feedback for quality improvement. In England, patient experience is measured by surveys including the General Practice Patient Survey (GPPS) in primary care and the Inpatient Survey in secondary care. At the individual doctor level, …read more

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New developments in diabetes technology: challenges and opportunities

New medical technologies are often developed and introduced at a much slower rate than patients and clinicians could wish. There are many reasons for this, including unanticipated complications arising during trials and the overarching need to ensure patient safety. In some cases, moreover, concepts emerge well before the technology exists to make their realisation a …read more

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Lords Reform: An unnecessary procedure?

As the election looms, what might various parties’ plans for reform of the House of Lords mean for the scrutiny of health and health care related legislation? Conor Farrington, a medical sociologist at CCHSR (but we stole him from political science), raises some concerns.

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Understanding user interactions with the artificial pancreas

The ‘artificial pancreas’ is a new treatment for diabetes which allows for the automatic control of blood glucose levels by replicating some of the functions of a healthy pancreas. The system wirelessly links together a set of devices – a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and insulin pump, both body-mounted, and a tablet-mounted algorithm – in …read more

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mH2 – the future of mental healthcare

Mental healthcare is often described as the Cinderella of medicine – overlooked, disparaged, and generally neglected. In the UK, mental healthcare is the single biggest item on the NHS budget (£12.16bn in 2010/11), but in practice this means that only about 11% of the overall spend is allocated to deal with 23% of the disease …read more

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Lost in translation: the impact of medical jargon on patient-centred care

In the days before BuzzFeed, amusing adverts snapped abroad by would-be photojournalists were a staple of email circulars. Who could forget the Chinese KFC ad that translated “finger-lickin’ good” to “eat your fingers off”, or the Italian campaign for “Schweppes toilet water”? Of course, you don’t have to go overseas to be met with mutual …read more

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Interliteracy: The promise (and pitfalls) of multidisciplinary research

In her recent inaugural lecture as Professor of Sociology at Cambridge, Sarah Franklin referred to the idea of ‘interliteracy’, which she defines as ‘disciplined reading across disciplines.’ Franklin’s inclusion of ‘disciplined’ is important because it highlights the importance of rigour, strategy, and design when working across disciplines. What she has in mind when she speaks …read more

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