Spotlight: Does pay for performance work or doesn’t it?

Martin Roland discusses the effects of pay for performance, following on from our study published in the New England Journal of Medicine this week.

NICE and Roche at loggerheads (again)

kadcyla

  NICE has today (8th August 2014) announced that it cannot recommend Roche’s latest breast cancer drug, Kadcyla (a combination of trastuzumab and emtansine) for routine use on the NHS because it is too expensive and hence not cost-effective.  The draft ‘no’ was actually published in May, but there has been a press release issued today …read more

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Medicalising life

Medicines have been getting into the mainstream news quite a lot in recent times. A couple of days ago saw the publication in Annals of Oncology of a review of the evidence for a protective effect of aspirin in reducing cancer in the general population. The role of aspirin in cardiovascular disease prevention is well …read more

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Let not thy will roar, when thy power can but whisper

Does power matter when using routine data and is there a point in performing a sample size/power calculation? Gary argues yes and yes!

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European Conference on Health Economics – Dublin, July 2014

bookofkells

Last week saw the European Conference on Health Economics (ECHE) hosted by Trinity College Dublin.  CCHSR’s Ed Wilson was there. International conferences are always a great opportunity to find out what your colleagues are up to in different corners of the world.  ECHE was no exception.  The venue was Trinity College Dublin, home to the beautifully …read more

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Keeping Cochrane reviews up-to-date

cochrane update

The Cochrane Collaboration is an organisation that conducts systematic reviews of healthcare interventions.  The idea is that they are updated periodically (every 2 years) so that they provide the best evidence on what works and what doesn’t. After 21 years of existence, the Cochrane Library now holds over 6000 reviews by some 20,000 volunteer authors.  …read more

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Conference report – SAPC 2014

For those who were unable to make it to Edinburgh for the 43rd annual conference of the Society of Academic Primary Care (9th – 11th July), here is my round-up of highs, lows, and (most importantly) the best and worst céilidh dancers at the conference dinner… As ever with national conferences, SAPC 2014 offered a …read more

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Lost in translation: the impact of medical jargon on patient-centred care

In the days before BuzzFeed, amusing adverts snapped abroad by would-be photojournalists were a staple of email circulars. Who could forget the Chinese KFC ad that translated “finger-lickin’ good” to “eat your fingers off”, or the Italian campaign for “Schweppes toilet water”? Of course, you don’t have to go overseas to be met with mutual …read more

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Writing a paper? Steal some ideas from storytellers

Prince Holding Flowers

Recently, I have spent a lot of time sighing over papers I have been asked to review, usually scribbling furiously in various margins “WHAT IS THE STORY HERE?” In team meetings, we often plan out papers by sketching out “the story” – what it is we want people to understand and take away from this …read more

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PPI, or the art of involving members of the public in health research

As a researcher, a physician, or a reader with an interest in health research, you may have come across the latest trendy acronym: PPI. PPI stands for “Patient and Public Involvement”, and is an umbrella term for anything that has to do with any sort of public participation in research in an advisory role. Therefore …read more

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  • The Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (CCHSR) is a collaboration between the University of Cambridge Health Services Research Group at the Institute of Public Health and the Health and Healthcare Group at RAND Europe. We aim to inform policy through evidence-based research on health services in the UK and internationally.